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Eating Disorders

Delve into the world of eating disorders and explore treatment options for a healthier, more balanced life.

The Role of Exercise in Eating Disorder Recovery

Eating Disorder Recovery

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) list different types of eating disorders that are, respectively, categorized under the Disorder Class: Feeding and Eating Disorders. Eating disorders are defined as “serious medical illnesses marked by severe disturbances to a person’s eating behavior,” and are characterized by abnormal, irregular eating habits, and an extreme concern with one’s body weight or shape. The pervasive symptoms associated with any type of eating disorder can cause adverse physiological consequences and interfere with one’s ability to adequately function in daily life. Further, eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness. There are a variety of eating disorder treatment options available. The path of recovery will not be the same for everyone, as everyone is unique with distinct needs. A personalized treatment plan will provide an individual with the highest potential for a successful long-term recovery.

The Role of Exercise

While exercise has long been recognized as an effective intervention for many psychological health issues, it has often been overlooked as a potential adjunct to eating disorder treatment. This may be, in part, due to the fact that over-exercising and purging through exercise are common features across all eating disorders, and these unhealthy practices are often some of the last symptoms to subside during recovery. According to Psychology Today, “the degree of over-exercise, as well as body image dissatisfaction, also predicts whether a person will relapse, an occurrence that happens in up to 52% of people who have initially recovered from an eating disorder.” Based on the assumption that individuals will misuse workout practices to compensate for increased food intake, eating disorder treatment has historically involved no access to exercise.

However, prohibiting or significantly restricting exercise during eating disorder treatment can hinder one’s recovery. Prolonged abstinence from exercising can exacerbate one’s body image dissatisfaction and trigger relapses. Hence, much like recovery from eating disorders involves the reintroduction of foods and/ or calories that have been previously eliminated, helping to reestablish a healthy relationship with exercise is becoming an increasingly common component of the eating disorder treatment protocol. There are several empirically supported benefits of including exercise in eating disorder recovery, such as:

  • Exercising has the potential to enhance one’s interoceptive awareness, which is one’s ability to sense internal cues (e.g., hunger, thirst, heartbeat, etc.), shaping how one feels and behaves. This, in turn, helps to support behavioral changes (such as eating and resting), as it improves one’s ability to notice when they feel hunger and/ or fatigue.
  • One study found that incorporating mindful exercise into eating disorder treatments boosts weight restoration and reduces compulsive thoughts. Mindful exercise involves paying attention to how your body moves and observing how you feel before, during, and after the movement.
  • Exercise during recovery increases individual’s autonomy, and clinical evidence demonstrates that when individuals have a sense of autonomy in their recovery plan it heightens their motivation to adhere to their treatment.

Scientific research demonstrates that exercising during eating disorder recovery improves treatment outcomes physically and mentally.

Treatment In Calabasas

Calabasas is a city in California. It is a well-known suburb of Los Angeles, located west of the San Fernando Valley and north of the Santa Monica Mountains. Over the past decade, the city of Calabasas has grown in its reputation for luxury as well as for privacy which makes it a hidden gem for residential living for society’s elite, and one of the most desirable destinations in Los Angeles County. It is also home to a plethora of highly qualified mental health clinicians providing an array of therapeutic services and treatment options.

The information above is provided for the use of informational purposes only. The above content is not to be substituted for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment, as in no way is it intended as an attempt to practice medicine, give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. As such, please do not use any material provided above to disregard professional advice or delay seeking treatment.

How To Support A Loved One With An Eating Disorder

Eating Disorder

Eating disorders are defined as “serious medical illnesses marked by severe disturbances to a person’s eating behavior,” and are characterized by abnormal, irregular eating habits, and an extreme concern with one’s body weight or shape. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) list different types of eating disorders all of which are, respectively, categorized under the Disorder Class: Feeding and Eating Disorders. The best way to help someone with an eating disorder is to be able to recognize its warning signs and encourage them to pursue treatment. While treatment for eating disorders generally requires professional, medical, and psychological intervention, there are a variety of ways you can support your loved one and their recovery process. Consider the following suggestions, provided by the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI):

  • Learn about eating disorders: The more information you know, the better equipped you will be to help your loved one avoid pitfalls and cope with challenges.
  • Remain optimistic: Remind yourself that things can change and reassure your loved one that recovery is possible.
  • Recognize and adjust any accommodating or enabling behaviors: Enabling behaviors refer to behaviors that you exhibit which help to reduce your loved one’s distress from the eating disorder (e.g., cleaning up vomit, normalizing being absent at mealtimes, etc.), but that collude with the disorder and cover up the negative consequences of their behaviors.
  • Be mindful of triggers: Avoid discussions about weight, shape, food, diets, and do not make negative statements about your own body in front of your loved one.
  • Maintain open lines of communication: Create an emotionally safe environment for your loved one to share and check in with them regularly. Listen more than you speak, remain engaged, and make sure they feel heard. Avoid judgment and resist the urge to advise or criticize. Even if you are unable to identify with or simply do not understand what they are going through, it is important to validate your loved one’s emotions by affirming their feelings.
  • Model a balanced relationship with your own food: Do not be afraid to eat normally in front of someone with an eating disorder because it can set an example of a healthy relationship with food.
  • Take care of yourself: Engage in activities (e.g., regular exercise, nutritious eating, self-care practices, ample sleep, etc.) that promote physical and mental well-being.

Eating disorders are chronic mental health conditions that require professional, long-term treatment. Every individual is different and will benefit most from a customized treatment plan when it comes to recovering from an eating disorder. The treatment plan for an individual diagnosed with an eating disorder will be directly informed by several contributing factors, such as: one’s exact diagnosis, how long he or she has been actively engaging in unhealthy eating habits, his or her personal health history, and the presence of any co-morbid disorders. Treatment plans often include a multidisciplinary approach. Recovering from an eating disorder is a process that takes time, so it is important to have patience and compassion for your loved one.

Treatment In Calabasas

Calabasas is a city in California. It is a well-known suburb of Los Angeles, located west of the San Fernando Valley and north of the Santa Monica Mountains. Over the past decade, the city of Calabasas has grown in its reputation for luxury as well as for privacy which makes it a hidden gem for residential living for society’s elite, and one of the most desirable destinations in Los Angeles County. It is also home to a plethora of highly qualified mental health clinicians providing an array of therapeutic services and treatment options.

The information above is provided for the use of informational purposes only. The above content is not to be substituted for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment, as in no way is it intended as an attempt to practice medicine, give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. As such, please do not use any material provided above to disregard professional advice or delay seeking treatment.

The Effects of Social Media on Body Image and Eating Disorders

Eating Disorders

Body image refers to how a person perceives, thinks, and feels about his or her own body. Negative body image develops most often in early childhood, with 50 percent of pre-adolescent girls and 30 percent of pre-adolescent boys stating they dislike their bodies. A negative body image perception can be quite dangerous, leading to many possible long- and short-term consequences. Several clinical studies, for example, show a negative body image is typically present in the development of eating disorders.

Eating disorders are complex psychological conditions that are characterized by abnormal, irregular eating habits, and an extreme concern with one’s body weight or shape. There are several different manifestations of eating disorders. The various types are listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) under the Disorder Class: Feeding and Eating Disorders. There is no single, identifiable cause as to why someone develops an eating disorder. Research has, however, indicated certain biological, psychological, interpersonal, and social risk factors that have been noted to increase one’s susceptibility for developing an eating disorder.

Social media is a “collective term for websites and applications that focus on communication, community-based input, interaction, content-sharing, and collaboration.” Social media has become ubiquitous in the lives of Americans, as it offers a platform for communication, information sharing, and entertainment. According to the Pew Research Center, 69% of adults and 81% of teens in the U.S. use social media. While social media has its benefits, such as connecting people across the globe and facilitating the spread of knowledge, there are also potential risks associated with its use. Several studies have suggested that “social media exposure could foster body dissatisfaction and result in risky eating behaviors by broadcasting thinness ideals individuals thus long for,” as physical appearance holds a central place in social media.

Although social comparison has long been a part of life, social media has greatly increased the number of opportunities to compare and the ways in which these types of comparisons occur. Social media offers an easily accessible arena for users to engage in detrimental comparison, “based on physical appearance and thinness ideals’ internalization through daily exposure to idealized bodies.” Studies have shown that individuals who compare their physical appearance to that of others they considered to be more attractive (e.g., social media influencers, models, celebrities, peers, etc.) had a higher chance of being dissatisfied with their body image and developing an eating disorder.

Treatment In Calabasas

Calabasas is a city in California. It is a well-known suburb of Los Angeles, located west of the San Fernando Valley and north of the Santa Monica Mountains. Over the past decade, the city of Calabasas has grown in its reputation for luxury as well as for privacy which makes it a hidden gem for residential living for society’s elite, and one of the most desirable destinations in Los Angeles County. It is also home to a plethora of highly qualified mental health clinicians providing an array of therapeutic services and treatment options.

The information above is provided for the use of informational purposes only. The above content is not to be substituted for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment, as in no way is it intended as an attempt to practice medicine, give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. As such, please do not use any material provided above to disregard professional advice or delay seeking treatment.

Body Image And Eating Disorders: How To Overcome Negative Thoughts

Body Image And Eating Disorders

Body image refers to how an individual perceives, thinks, and feels about his or her own body. Negative body image develops most often in early childhood, with 50 percent of pre-adolescent girls and 30 percent of pre-adolescent boys stating they dislike their bodies. A negative body image perception can be quite dangerous, leading to many possible long- and short-term consequences. Research has shown, for example, that a negative body image is one of the strongest predictors for the development of an eating disorder. Eating disorders are complex psychological conditions that are characterized by abnormal, irregular eating habits, and an extreme concern with one’s body weight or shape. The National Institute of Mental Health (NIH) specifically defines eating disorders as “serious medical illnesses marked by severe disturbances to a person’s eating behavior.” There are different types of eating disorders listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) under the Disorder Class: Feeding and Eating Disorders.

How To Overcome Negative Thoughts

While everyone experiences negative thoughts or feeling about their body from time to time, overcoming negative body image and thoughts related to eating disorders can be a particularly challenging process. To help adopt a healthier body image, consider the following tips, provided by the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA):

  • Be kind to yourself: Practicing positive self-talk, for example, encourages self-confidence, effective coping, achievement, and a general feeling of well-being. Select a few affirmations, or positive statements about your body and repeat them regularly. Avoid self-criticism, treat yourself with respect, and shift your internal dialogue to replace negative self-talk with more positive and realistic statements.
  • Strengthen social connections: Build a robust support network that includes people who understand and support your journey towards a healthier body image. Surrounding yourself with positive influences can help reinforce a healthier mindset.
  • Focus on your health rather than your appearance: Shift your focus from appearance-related goals to overall health and well-being. Engage in activities (e.g., regular exercise, nutritious eating, self-care practices, ample sleep, etc.) that promote physical and mental well-being.
  • Set realistic goals: While there are benefits to aiming high, it is advantageous to start small. Unattainable goals, like striving for perfection in terms of appearance or body shape, only set you up for failure. Instead, set realistic and attainable goals related to overall health, well-being, and self-acceptance.

It is important to bear in mind that change takes time, and shifting negative thought patterns is a process that is not always linear. However, with ample support, effective strategies, and patience, it is possible for you to cultivate a healthier and more positive relationship with your body.

Treatment In Calabasas

Calabasas is a city in California. It is a well-known suburb of Los Angeles, located west of the San Fernando Valley and north of the Santa Monica Mountains. Over the past decade, the city of Calabasas has grown in its reputation for luxury as well as for privacy which makes it a hidden gem for residential living for society’s elite, and one of the most desirable destinations in Los Angeles County. It is also home to a plethora of highly qualified mental health clinicians providing an array of therapeutic services and treatment options.

The information above is provided for the use of informational purposes only. The above content is not to be substituted for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment, as in no way is it intended as an attempt to practice medicine, give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. As such, please do not use any material provided above to disregard professional advice or delay seeking treatment.

Eating Disorders: Understanding The Different Types

Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are psychological disorders that are loosely characterized by abnormal, irregular eating habits, and an extreme concern with one’s body weight or shape. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) list different types of eating disorders, all of which are categorized under the Disorder Class: Feeding and Eating Disorders. Understanding the various types is important for recognizing and addressing these disorders effectively. Some of the main types of eating disorders include the following, provided by the Mayo Clinic:

  • Anorexia nervosa: Is an eating disorder characterized by weight loss and/ or lack of appropriate weight gain, an inability to maintain an appropriate body weight for one’s age, height, stature, intense fear of gaining weight and a distorted perception of body image (weight and/ or shape). People struggling with anorexia will employ extreme efforts to control their weight and/ or shape, which can significantly interfere with their ability to properly function in their daily life.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Is an eating disorder characterized by a cycle of overeating (bingeing) and compensatory behaviors (purging) in attempts to undo the effects of the binge eating episodes. Purging could include self-induced vomiting, excessively over exercising, and/ or abusing diuretics.
  • Binge-eating disorder (BED): Is an eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of compulsively eating abnormally large quantities of food (often quickly) to the point of physical discomfort, without engaging in compensatory behaviors. Often binge episodes are followed with emotions of embarrassment, shame, guilt, and/ or distress.
  • Rumination disorder: Is an eating disorder characterized by repeatedly and unintentionally regurgitating (spitting up) undigested or partially digested food from the stomach, chewing it again, and either swallowing it or spitting it out.
  • Avoidant/ restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID): Is an eating disorder characterized by restricting food intake (e.g., eating smaller amounts) and/ or eliminating certain food groups to the point of infringing on one’s exposure and ability to absorb needed nutrients coming from food.
  • Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorders (OSFED): As indicated in the DSM-5, OSFED, formerly known as Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS) is diagnosed when a person presents with feeding or eating behaviors that cause clinically significant distress and impairment, but do not meet the full criteria for any of the other disorders.

Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness. According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), an estimated 30 million U.S. adults will have an eating disorder at some point in their lives. The pervasive symptoms associated with any type of eating disorder can cause adverse physiological consequences, interfere with one’s ability to adequately function in daily life, and if left untreated can become life-threatening.

 

Treatment In Calabasas

Calabasas is a city in California. It is a well-known suburb of Los Angeles, located west of the San Fernando Valley and north of the Santa Monica Mountains. Over the past decade, the city of Calabasas has grown in its reputation for luxury as well as for privacy which makes it a hidden gem for residential living for society’s elite, and one of the most desirable destinations in Los Angeles County. It is also home to a plethora of highly qualified mental health clinicians providing an array of therapeutic services and treatment options.

 

The information above is provided for the use of informational purposes only. The above content is not to be substituted for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment, as in no way is it intended as an attempt to practice medicine, give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. As such, please do not use any material provided above to disregard professional advice or delay seeking treatment.

Eating Disorders Are On The Rise In USA

Eating Disorders in USA

Eating disorders are complex psychological conditions that are broadly characterized by abnormal, irregular eating habits, and an extreme concern with one’s body weight or shape. They are specifically defined by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIH) as “serious medical illnesses marked by severe disturbances to a person’s eating behavior.” There are several different types and each are recognized as chronic mental health disorders listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) under the Disorder Class: Feeding and Eating Disorders. The pervasive symptoms associated with any type of eating disorder can cause adverse physiological consequences and interfere with one’s ability to function optimally in daily life.

According to Proclamation 10340 of February 18, 2022, which is a presidential document by the Executive Office of the President, “nearly 1 in 10 Americans are expected to develop an eating disorder in their lifetime.” Recent data estimates up to 24 million people of all ages and genders currently suffer from an eating disorder in the U.S., and 95% of those who have eating disorders are between the ages of 12 and 25. Experts assert that 13% of adolescents will develop an eating disorder by the age of 20. Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness.

Is Covid-19 To Blame?

The novel coronavirus, also referred to as Covid-19, traveled rampantly through the world, affecting millions of individuals in a variety of ways. In efforts to slow the spread of the virus, states all across America instituted social distancing guidelines, implemented sporadic stay-at-home orders for all non-essential workers, closures of restaurants, schools, entertainment venues and more. Although the demand for mental health services significantly increased, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), the Covid-19 pandemic disrupted critical mental health services in 93% of countries worldwide. The WHO further reported that 72% of mental health services for adolescents were halted between June and August 2020, and within this population a surge in the prevalence of eating disorders occurred that was said to be exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic.

A study published in JAMA Pediatrics explained that across America, inpatient admissions for young adults and adolescents with eating disorders rose by a rate of approximately 0.7% per month in the two years leading up to the pandemic. In 2020, the first year of the pandemic, that growth increased to an average of 7.2% per month. The pandemic may be partially to blame for the rise in eating disorders, but more importantly it unmasked a global eating disorder public health crisis and simultaneously highlighted the urgent need to raise awareness of these disorders.

Treatment In Calabasas

Calabasas is a city in California. It is a well-known suburb of Los Angeles, located west of the San Fernando Valley and north of the Santa Monica Mountains. Over the past decade, the city of Calabasas has grown in its reputation for luxury as well as for privacy which makes it a hidden gem for residential living for society’s elite, and one of the most desirable destinations in Los Angeles County. It is also home to a plethora of highly qualified mental health clinicians providing an array of therapeutic services and treatment options.

The information above is provided for the use of informational purposes only. The above content is not to be substituted for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment, as in no way is it intended as an attempt to practice medicine, give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. As such, please do not use any material provided above to disregard professional advice or delay seeking treatment.

Everything You Need To Know About Eating Disorders

eating disorder

Eating disorders are defined by the American Psychiatric Association as “behavioral conditions characterized by severe and persistent disturbance in eating behaviors and associated distressing thoughts and emotions.” There is no single, identifiable cause as to why an individual develops an eating disorder. Research has, however, indicated certain biological, psychological, interpersonal, and social risk factors that have been noted to increase a person’s susceptibility for developing an eating disorder. According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), an estimated 30 million U.S. adults will have an eating disorder at some point in their lives.

Types Of Eating Disorders

There are several different types of eating disorders listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), all of which are categorized under the Disorder Class: Feeding and Eating Disorders. They include:

    • Anorexia nervosa: is an eating disorder characterized by weight loss and/ or lack of appropriate weight gain in growing children, an inability to maintain an appropriate body weight for one’s age, height, stature, intense fear of gaining weight and a distorted perception of body image (weight and/ or shape). People struggling with anorexia will employ extreme efforts to control their weight and/ or shape.
    • Bulimia nervosa: is an eating disorder characterized by a cycle of overeating (bingeing) and compensatory behaviors (purging) in attempts to undo the effects of the binge eating episodes. Purging could include self-induced vomiting, excessively over exercising, and/ or abusing diuretics.
    • Binge-eating disorder (BED): is an eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of compulsively eating abnormally large quantities of food (often quickly) to the point of physical discomfort, without engaging in compensatory behaviors.
  • Rumination syndrome: is a feeding and eating disorder characterized by repeatedly and unintentionally regurgitating (spitting up) undigested or partially digested food from the stomach, chewing it again and either swallowing it or spitting it out.
  • Avoidant/ restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID): is an eating disorder characterized by restricting food intake (e.g., eating smaller amounts) and/ or eliminating certain food groups to the point of infringing on one’s exposure to and ability to absorb needed nutrients derived from food.

Eating disorders can be debilitating and can adversely affect a person’s emotions, health, and interfere with one’s ability to adequately function in his or her daily life.

Signs and Symptoms

Every person is unique and will exhibit a distinct set of signs and symptoms as they relate to the presence of an eating disorder. Additionally, the type of eating disorder will influence which signs and symptoms present. The Mayo Clinic provides a list of examples of behaviors that could be indicative of an eating disorder, some of which include the following:

  • Obsessively focusing on healthy eating
  • Skipping meals
  • Withdrawing from social activities
  • Making excuses to avoid eating
  • Adhering to an overly restrictive diet
  • Preparing separate meals when eating in a group instead of eating what everyone else is eating
  • Excessive exercise
  • Constantly checking the mirror and/ or pointing out perceived flaws
  • Using laxatives, herbal weight loss products, and/ or dietary supplements
  • Regularly excusing oneself during meals to use the restroom
  • Eating in secret
  • Expressing disgust, shame, and/ or guilt about one’s eating habits

The continued malnutrition that occurs with an untreated eating disorder can lead to severe short and long-term consequences. Although eating disorders are life-long conditions, with proper treatment and support, a person can learn to effectively manage its symptoms.

Treatment In Calabasas

Calabasas is a city in California. It is a well-known suburb of Los Angeles, located west of the San Fernando Valley and north of the Santa Monica Mountains. Over the past decade, the city of Calabasas has grown in its reputation for luxury as well as for privacy which makes it a hidden gem for residential living for society’s elite, and one of the most desirable destinations in Los Angeles County. It is also home to a plethora of highly qualified mental health clinicians providing an array of therapeutic services and treatment options.

The information above is provided for the use of informational purposes only. The above content is not to be substituted for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment, as in no way is it intended as an attempt to practice medicine, give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. As such, please do not use any material provided above to disregard professional advice or delay seeking treatment.

Caring For A Loved One With An Eating Disorder

Eating Disorder

There are several different types of eating disorders listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), and each is categorized under the Disorder Class: Feeding and Eating Disorders. Eating disorders are neurological disorders that are loosely characterized by abnormal, irregular eating habits, and an extreme concern with one’s body weight or shape. The three most common eating disorders are anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder. Eating disorders are serious illnesses that are often accompanied by life-threatening physical and mental health complications. Assuming the role of caretaker for a loved one struggling with an eating disorder can be an enormous and overwhelming undertaking. When caring for an individual with an eating disorder, it is essential to understand the specific eating disorder your loved one is battling and arm yourself with an array of coping techniques and strategies to offer the most useful support. As a caretaker faced with navigating a loved one’s eating disorder consider the following suggestions to set yourself up for success:

  • Learn as much as you can: Caregivers should educate themselves and try to understand the disorder by reading credible sources and speaking with professionals.
  • Practice self-care: It can be easy to lose sight of the importance of maintaining and prioritizing your own health and well-being. However, if you become emotionally or mentally unwell you will be doing a disservice to your loved one who is battling an eating disorder, as you will be unable to properly care for them.
  • Do not take things personally: Individuals who are struggling with an eating disorder did not choose their diagnosis and they usually do not intentionally mean to hurt their loved ones.
  • Acknowledge big and small accomplishments: Caregivers should always offer encouragement to their loved one by expressing pride for any accomplishments that align with and reinforce a healthy relationship with food.
  • Appearing preoccupied is to be expected: Keep in mind that obsessive thoughts of food, weight and body image are occupying your loved one’s mind from the moment they wake up to the moment they go to sleep.
  • Pay attention to red flags: A caretaker must be able to recognize the warning signs that may indicate setbacks in one’s recovery.
  • Patience is key: Recovery is a long process and does not happen overnight.
  • Nobody is to blame: Although the exact cause behind why an individual develops an eating disorder remains unknown, research has found that it is likely due to a combination of psychological, biological, and environmental factors.

According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), an estimated 30 million U.S. adults will have an eating disorder at some point in their lives.

 

Treatment In Calabasas

Calabasas is a city in California. It is a well-known suburb of Los Angeles, located west of the San Fernando Valley and north of the Santa Monica Mountains. Over the past decade, the city of Calabasas has grown in its reputation for luxury as well as for privacy which makes it a hidden gem for residential living for society’s elite, and one of the most desirable destinations in Los Angeles County. It is also home to a plethora of highly qualified mental health clinicians providing an array of therapeutic services and treatment options.

The information above is provided for the use of informational purposes only. The above content is not to be substituted for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment, as in no way is it intended as an attempt to practice medicine, give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. As such, please do not use any material provided above to disregard professional advice or delay seeking treatment.

What’s The Most Serious Eating Disorder?

Eating disorders are defined by the American Psychiatric Association as “behavioral conditions characterized by severe and persistent disturbance in eating behaviors and associated distressing thoughts and emotions.” There are several different types and each are recognized as chronic psychological conditions listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) under the Disorder Class: Feeding and Eating Disorders. The pervasive symptoms associated with any type of eating disorder can cause adverse physiological consequences and interfere with one’s ability to function optimally in daily life. Experts consider anorexia nervosa, colloquially known as anorexia, to be the most severe type of eating disorder because it has the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder.

Anorexia

Anorexia is characterized by “an abnormally low body weight, an intense fear of gaining weight and a distorted perception of weight.” An individual struggling with anorexia may exhibit behavioral warning signs such as skipping meals, over-exercising, obsessively reading nutritional information, constantly weighing themselves, regularly making excuses not to eat, denial of a problem despite excessive weight loss, etc. People with anorexia engage in a cycle of self-starvation that often result in malnutrition including a lack of essential minerals and nutrients. When an individual with anorexia becomes severely malnourished, every organ in his or her body can suffer irreparable damage. There are myriad adverse short and long-term effects of anorexia, and without proper treatment anorexia can lead to life-threatening consequences.

Facts and Stats

There are several eye-opening facts and statistics related to anorexia, as well as many misconceptions about this eating disorder, such as:

  • There is currently no medication approved by the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) for the treatment of anorexia.
  • 1 in 5 anorexia deaths are by suicide.
  • The mortality rate associated with anorexia is 12 times higher than the death rate of all causes of death for females aged 15 to 24 years old.
  • 20% of women diagnosed with anorexia have high levels of autistic traits.

Anorexia is considered one of the most lethal psychiatric disorders, carrying a sixfold increased risk of death. Further, the South Carolina Department of Mental Health assert that twenty percent of people suffering from anorexia will die prematurely due to complications related to their eating disorder.

Treatment In Calabasas

Calabasas is a city in California. It is a well-known suburb of Los Angeles, located west of the San Fernando Valley and north of the Santa Monica Mountains. Over the past decade, the city of Calabasas has grown in its reputation for luxury as well as for privacy which makes it a hidden gem for residential living for society’s elite, and one of the most desirable destinations in Los Angeles County. It is also home to a plethora of highly qualified mental health clinicians providing an array of therapeutic services and treatment options.

The information above is provided for the use of informational purposes only. The above content is not to be substituted for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment, as in no way is it intended as an attempt to practice medicine, give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. As such, please do not use any material provided above to disregard professional advice or delay seeking treatment.

What Are The Signs Of An Eating Disorder?

eating disorder

Eating disorders are complex psychological conditions that are broadly characterized by abnormal, irregular eating habits, and an extreme concern with one’s body weight or shape. They are defined as “serious medical illnesses marked by severe disturbances to a person’s eating behavior.” The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) includes different types of eating disorders, all of which are categorized under the Disorder Class: Feeding and Eating Disorders. Each type of eating disorder is associated with different signs and symptoms, as indicated below: 

  • Anorexia nervosa: is an eating disorder characterized by weight loss and/ or lack of appropriate wait gain in growing children, an inability to maintain an appropriate body weight for one’s age, height, stature, intense fear of gaining weight and a distorted perception of body image (weight and/ or shape). People struggling with anorexia will employ extreme efforts to control their weight and/ or shape, which can significantly interfere with their ability to properly function in daily life. The Mayo Clinic provides examples of common signs of anorexia, some of which include: 
    • Thin appearance
    • Insomnia
    • Extreme weight loss
    • Not making expected developmental weight gains
  • Dizziness and/ or fainting
  • Abnormal blood counts
  • Fatigue
  • Thinning, brittle hair
  • Absence of menstruation
  • Dry and/ or yellowish skin
  • Irregular heart rhythms
  • Low blood pressure
  • Dehydration
  • Excessively exercising
  • Bulimia nervosa: is an eating disorder characterized by a cycle of overeating (bingeing) and compensatory behaviors (purging) in attempts to undo the effects of the binge eating episodes. Purging could include self-induced vomiting, excessively over exercising, and/ or abusing diuretics. The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) provides examples of common signs of bulimia, some of which include:
    • Appears uncomfortable eating around others
    • Fear of eating in public or with others
    • Shows unusual swelling of the cheeks or jaw area
    • Discolored, stained teeth
    • Has calluses on the back of the hands and knuckles from self-induced vomiting
    • Diets frequently
    • Shows extreme concern with body weight and shape
    • Extreme mood swings
    • Difficulty concentrating
    • Dizziness
    • Fainting
    • Non-specific gastrointestinal complaints
    • Sleeping problems
    • Muscle weakness
    • Impaired immune system
  • Binge-eating disorder (BED): is an eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of compulsively eating abnormally large quantities of food (often quickly) to the point of physical discomfort, without engaging in compensatory behaviors. Often binge episodes are followed by emotions of embarrassment, shame, guilt, and/ or distress. The Office on Women’s Health (OASH) provides examples of common signs of binge-eating disorder, some of which include:
    • Noticeable weight fluctuations
    • Depression
    • Eating in secret
    • Anxiety
    • Low self-esteem/ low self-worth
    • Skipping meals
    • Hiding food in unusual places
    • Eating excessive amounts of food in a short period of time
    • Continuing to eat, even when painfully full 
    • Inability to feel satiated
    • Suicidal ideation
  • Rumination syndrome: is a feeding and eating disorder characterized by repeatedly and unintentionally regurgitating (spitting up) undigested or partially digested food from the stomach, chewing it again and either swallowing it or spitting it out. The Mayo Clinic provides examples of common signs of rumination syndrome, some of which include:
    • Effortless regurgitation, typically within 10 minutes of eating
    • Abdominal pain or pressure relieved by regurgitation
    • A feeling of fullness
    • Bad breath
    • Nausea
    • Unintentional weight loss
  • Avoidant/ restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID): is an eating disorder characterized by restricting food intake (e.g., eating smaller amounts) and/ or eliminating certain groups to the point of infringing on one’s exposure to and ability to absorb needed nutrients coming from food. The National Eating Disorders Association provides examples of common signs of AFRID, some of which include:
    • Sudden refusal to eat foods previously eaten
    • Fear of choking, vomiting, pain or nausea due to certain foods or the act of eating
    • Lack of appetite or low appetite without medical cause
    • Very slow eating, easily distracted during eating or forgetting to eat

The information above is provided for the use of informational purposes only. The above content is not to be substituted for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment, as in no way is it intended as an attempt to practice medicine, give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. As such, please do not use any material provided above to disregard professional advice or delay seeking treatment.

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