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Eating Disorders Are On The Rise In USA

Eating Disorders in USA

Eating disorders are complex psychological conditions that are broadly characterized by abnormal, irregular eating habits, and an extreme concern with one’s body weight or shape. They are specifically defined by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIH) as “serious medical illnesses marked by severe disturbances to a person’s eating behavior.” There are several different types and each are recognized as chronic mental health disorders listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) under the Disorder Class: Feeding and Eating Disorders. The pervasive symptoms associated with any type of eating disorder can cause adverse physiological consequences and interfere with one’s ability to function optimally in daily life.

According to Proclamation 10340 of February 18, 2022, which is a presidential document by the Executive Office of the President, “nearly 1 in 10 Americans are expected to develop an eating disorder in their lifetime.” Recent data estimates up to 24 million people of all ages and genders currently suffer from an eating disorder in the U.S., and 95% of those who have eating disorders are between the ages of 12 and 25. Experts assert that 13% of adolescents will develop an eating disorder by the age of 20. Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness.

Is Covid-19 To Blame?

The novel coronavirus, also referred to as Covid-19, traveled rampantly through the world, affecting millions of individuals in a variety of ways. In efforts to slow the spread of the virus, states all across America instituted social distancing guidelines, implemented sporadic stay-at-home orders for all non-essential workers, closures of restaurants, schools, entertainment venues and more. Although the demand for mental health services significantly increased, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), the Covid-19 pandemic disrupted critical mental health services in 93% of countries worldwide. The WHO further reported that 72% of mental health services for adolescents were halted between June and August 2020, and within this population a surge in the prevalence of eating disorders occurred that was said to be exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic.

A study published in JAMA Pediatrics explained that across America, inpatient admissions for young adults and adolescents with eating disorders rose by a rate of approximately 0.7% per month in the two years leading up to the pandemic. In 2020, the first year of the pandemic, that growth increased to an average of 7.2% per month. The pandemic may be partially to blame for the rise in eating disorders, but more importantly it unmasked a global eating disorder public health crisis and simultaneously highlighted the urgent need to raise awareness of these disorders.

Treatment In Calabasas

Calabasas is a city in California. It is a well-known suburb of Los Angeles, located west of the San Fernando Valley and north of the Santa Monica Mountains. Over the past decade, the city of Calabasas has grown in its reputation for luxury as well as for privacy which makes it a hidden gem for residential living for society’s elite, and one of the most desirable destinations in Los Angeles County. It is also home to a plethora of highly qualified mental health clinicians providing an array of therapeutic services and treatment options.

The information above is provided for the use of informational purposes only. The above content is not to be substituted for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment, as in no way is it intended as an attempt to practice medicine, give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. As such, please do not use any material provided above to disregard professional advice or delay seeking treatment.

Everything You Need To Know About Eating Disorders

eating disorder

Eating disorders are defined by the American Psychiatric Association as “behavioral conditions characterized by severe and persistent disturbance in eating behaviors and associated distressing thoughts and emotions.” There is no single, identifiable cause as to why an individual develops an eating disorder. Research has, however, indicated certain biological, psychological, interpersonal, and social risk factors that have been noted to increase a person’s susceptibility for developing an eating disorder. According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), an estimated 30 million U.S. adults will have an eating disorder at some point in their lives.

Types Of Eating Disorders

There are several different types of eating disorders listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), all of which are categorized under the Disorder Class: Feeding and Eating Disorders. They include:

    • Anorexia nervosa: is an eating disorder characterized by weight loss and/ or lack of appropriate weight gain in growing children, an inability to maintain an appropriate body weight for one’s age, height, stature, intense fear of gaining weight and a distorted perception of body image (weight and/ or shape). People struggling with anorexia will employ extreme efforts to control their weight and/ or shape.
    • Bulimia nervosa: is an eating disorder characterized by a cycle of overeating (bingeing) and compensatory behaviors (purging) in attempts to undo the effects of the binge eating episodes. Purging could include self-induced vomiting, excessively over exercising, and/ or abusing diuretics.
    • Binge-eating disorder (BED): is an eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of compulsively eating abnormally large quantities of food (often quickly) to the point of physical discomfort, without engaging in compensatory behaviors.
  • Rumination syndrome: is a feeding and eating disorder characterized by repeatedly and unintentionally regurgitating (spitting up) undigested or partially digested food from the stomach, chewing it again and either swallowing it or spitting it out.
  • Avoidant/ restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID): is an eating disorder characterized by restricting food intake (e.g., eating smaller amounts) and/ or eliminating certain food groups to the point of infringing on one’s exposure to and ability to absorb needed nutrients derived from food.

Eating disorders can be debilitating and can adversely affect a person’s emotions, health, and interfere with one’s ability to adequately function in his or her daily life.

Signs and Symptoms

Every person is unique and will exhibit a distinct set of signs and symptoms as they relate to the presence of an eating disorder. Additionally, the type of eating disorder will influence which signs and symptoms present. The Mayo Clinic provides a list of examples of behaviors that could be indicative of an eating disorder, some of which include the following:

  • Obsessively focusing on healthy eating
  • Skipping meals
  • Withdrawing from social activities
  • Making excuses to avoid eating
  • Adhering to an overly restrictive diet
  • Preparing separate meals when eating in a group instead of eating what everyone else is eating
  • Excessive exercise
  • Constantly checking the mirror and/ or pointing out perceived flaws
  • Using laxatives, herbal weight loss products, and/ or dietary supplements
  • Regularly excusing oneself during meals to use the restroom
  • Eating in secret
  • Expressing disgust, shame, and/ or guilt about one’s eating habits

The continued malnutrition that occurs with an untreated eating disorder can lead to severe short and long-term consequences. Although eating disorders are life-long conditions, with proper treatment and support, a person can learn to effectively manage its symptoms.

Treatment In Calabasas

Calabasas is a city in California. It is a well-known suburb of Los Angeles, located west of the San Fernando Valley and north of the Santa Monica Mountains. Over the past decade, the city of Calabasas has grown in its reputation for luxury as well as for privacy which makes it a hidden gem for residential living for society’s elite, and one of the most desirable destinations in Los Angeles County. It is also home to a plethora of highly qualified mental health clinicians providing an array of therapeutic services and treatment options.

The information above is provided for the use of informational purposes only. The above content is not to be substituted for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment, as in no way is it intended as an attempt to practice medicine, give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. As such, please do not use any material provided above to disregard professional advice or delay seeking treatment.

What Are The 5 Most Common Personality Disorders?

Personality Disorders

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) lists ten standalone personality disorders. Although each personality disorder has distinct characteristics, each of the different personality disorders is categorized into one of three clusters (cluster A, cluster B, and cluster C). According to the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) cluster A personality disorders are characterized by eccentric, odd thinking, or behavior; cluster B personality disorders are characterized by overly emotional, dramatic, or unpredictable thinking or behavior; and cluster C personality disorders are characterized by fearful, anxious thinking or behavior. The personality disorders that make up each cluster share similar symptoms and have overlapping characteristics. Data provided by the Cambridge University Press indicates that the global pooled prevalence of any personality disorder is 7.8%. The most common personality disorders are listed below.

Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder

Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCD) belongs to cluster C. OCD is characterized by unreasonable, uncontrollable, or recurring thoughts (obsessions) followed by a behavioral response (compulsions). Obsessions are defined as “repeated thoughts, urges, or mental images that cause anxiety.” Compulsions are defined as “repetitive behaviors that a person with OCD feels the urge to do in response to an obsessive thought.” The International OCD Foundation asserts that OCD equally affects men, women, and children of all races, ethnicities, and backgrounds. OCD often begins in childhood, adolescence, or early adulthood; the average age symptoms appear is 19 years old. According to Anxiety and Depression Association of America approximately 2.3% of the population has OCD, which is about 1 in 40 adults and 1 in 100 children in the U.S.

Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) belongs to cluster B. The Mayo Clinic explains that people with NPD “have an inflated sense of their own importance, a deep need for excessive attention and admiration, troubled relationships, and a lack of empathy for others.” The Cleveland Clinic estimates that up to 5% of people have NPD, while other sources assert the prevalence rates of NPD can range between 1% to 15% of the United States population.

Borderline Personality Disorder

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) belongs to cluster B. BPD is characterized by “a pervasive pattern of instability and hypersensitivity in interpersonal relationships, instability in self-image, extreme mood fluctuations, and impulsivity.” The National Institute of Mental Health (NIH) estimates that 1.4% of the adult population in America experience BPD.

Paranoid Personality Disorder

Paranoid personality disorder (PPD) belongs to cluster A. The Merck Manual explains that paranoid personality disorder is “characterized by a pervasive pattern of unwarranted distrust and suspicion of others that involves interpreting their motives as malicious.” The Cleveland Clinic refers to studies that estimate PPD affects between 2.3% and 4.4% of the general population, and it is thought to be more common among men.

Schizoid Personality Disorder

Schizoid personality disorder belongs to cluster A. The Merck Manual explains “schizoid personality disorder is characterized by a pervasive pattern of detachment from and general disinterest in social relationships and a limited range of emotions in interpersonal relationships.” The American Psychiatric Association estimates that between six and seven million Americans suffer from schizoid personality disorder. The most recent research from the National Institutes of Health on the subject suggests that almost five percent of the population has schizoid personality disorder.

 

The information above is provided for the use of informational purposes only. The above content is not to be substituted for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment, as in no way is it intended as an attempt to practice medicine, give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. As such, please do not use any material provided above to disregard professional advice or delay seeking treatment.

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